Posts tagged as:

coping

Six Flags NJ – bring a doctor note

October 7, 2015

This summer, I finally managed to stop in at the guest services building (which is not the main guest services, so ask first before you wait in the line) at Six Flags in Jackson, NJ. I picked up the Equal Access Pass for my son with ASD. The process was super-fast and painless. The pass […]

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Autism costs more than money

May 4, 2012

  Here’s a short CNN piece reflecting on the costs of autism. It’s not news to those of us who’ve been living with it, but I’m sure it will surprise the heck out of those friends of yours and mine who don’t know the numbers. But there’s another poignant moment in this piece that is […]

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Making enemies of parents and teachers

March 21, 2010

This post on paying for our own professionals from rickcolosimo.com was sparked by a health-care editorial, related to prohibitions on sharing legal fees with non-lawyers, and now belongs here. The phrase “doctors and patients as enemies” is what knocked me over in the reposted editorial by Milton Friedman. Is there anyone who doubts that very […]

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Autism’s urban legend

February 19, 2010

Jen Laviano (@JenLaviano) has a post up this week that mentions my un-favorite urban legend about autism: that there are parents who get their kids a diagnosis so that they can get “extra help” from their school district. Jen talks about having discussions with parents, friends, relatives, teachers, etc. to explain the value of special […]

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Down with Autism!

July 1, 2009

Let’s be clear. Autism sucks; it certainly sucks for my son. (And I don’t lump the Asperger’s group into this: I have met Aspies who are cogent, gainfully employed, capable, present in the world, and able to self-advocate; Dylan wasn’t at all like that before getting high-quality ABA and has a long way to go, […]

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Autism writes

June 18, 2009

This all-too-short essay from a 14-year-old who had autism is practically overwhelming for me to read. I will freely confess that I still believe my son will be able to write something like this some day, at the same time that I freely admit that he might never write a sentence that he isn’t taught. […]

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